• Hello - I recently bought my SC MJ 82 (German 204 hp) and have already driven the first few kilometers - with great pleasure.

    It's clear that after 20 years of less use there's a lot to do, I'll have it checked at the beginning of July, so I'm being cautious for the time being.

    Since everything is new to me, I sniffed it first and noticed in the engine compartment that a large air hose was not fixed at the back and therefore did not lock (the hood dampers were recently replaced and probably not fitted correctly) - I have corrected this, would this have any influence if it was not fitted correctly?

    On the large black plastic box above the fan wheel there is a nozzle on the right - looks to me as if a hose belongs on there - or is that normal?

    After repeatedly opening the hood, it suddenly stopped locking and was ajar, could neither be opened nor closed properly. I then used a screwdriver to push the pin slightly towards the engine and it opened. Now, however, after a little pushing and jerking, it can no longer be engaged, remains in the gap but opens without being pushed.

    Now I'm not sure what the reason is - the hood wasn't installed quite correctly and is protruding symmetrically about 5 mm to the rear. When I pull on the cable, I don't really feel anything happening in the "hole" - only a very narrow crescent is pushed forward. I tried to photograph it. Do I have to change the position of the pin on the hood or should this crescent come out further than it does to engage? I'm a bit afraid that something will get stuck and I won't be able to get anything open.

    Any tips are welcome and if there is any good literature / repair instructions I would be happy to receive a tip.

    Greetings

    Daniel

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  • The crankcase/fuel tank ventilation was connected to the hose nozzle on the early G models.

    Later models have a rubber plug.

    Without the plug, unfiltered air can be sucked in.

    The large air hose guides the air from the fan through the heat exchanger. This can lead to poor heating performance, but is otherwise not a problem.

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    1982 SC 3,0 US, 930.16 Motor, indisch Rot

    Schiebedach, Klima, Leder schwarz, Bilstein Fahrwerk, Dansk Sportauspuff

    1969 914 Adriablau,umgbaut auf 6zylinder und 5 lochfahrwerk

  • Many thanks - does anyone have a part number or a designation for the plug - strange that there is none inside ...

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  • Hello Daniel,

    without a rear spoiler, you normally only need one hood damper.

    Two dampers or with too high a compression force Nm/kp could possibly lift or warp the rear lid.

    The thick steel wire goes to the lock on the rear hood lock.

    Attach a thin steel cable with a cable clamp where the steel wire is attached and run it under the rear panel towards the left rear light and then underneath into the open.

    This way you could also unlock your hood lock from the outside in an emergency.

    This also works at the front:-)

    The newer vehicles from 964 onwards have this "emergency release" as standard. To my knowledge, however, only at the front.

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    Schöne Grüße aus Niederbayern

    G-Modell, 3.2 Cabrio rot, Bj. Sep. 88, 218 PS

  • Thanks for that - yes, there are 2 dampers installed! The flap is currently open - unfortunately I can no longer get it to latch, i.e. at the moment it can be opened but not closed, not even with force - it doesn't latch. The emergency release is a very good idea

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  • The newer vehicles from 964 onwards have this "emergency release" as standard. To my knowledge, however, only at the front.

    In the 996 from MY 2000 onwards, front and rear. But it's almost vital, because it's operated electrically, which means that if the battery is flat, you can no longer open the hoods (and therefore can't get to the battery - typical over-engineering...). :kdash:)

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    996 Turbo WLS Coupé

    911 G Targa

    Geiler is' schon! (Marius 1983)

    "Irgendwann mal" ist jetzt! (Jörg)

  • Hello!

    I believe that the air filter box you have is not from a 930.10 engine with 204hp. As you can see on the picture from Rossepassion.com, it no longer has this nozzle. But if yours is running then put a rubber plug in there so that it can no longer draw in the wrong air.



    :wink:

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    Porsche 911 SC / 930.10 Motor / Bj.1982 Pazifikblaumet.

  • Hi there,

    This book [ad] is a very good help (it is in English and strictly speaking only for the US version, but most of it is identical).

    The plug can be found in the spare parts catalog 911SC, 1978-83 on plate 106-00, item 9A (930 110 299 00). But first feel with your finger whether there really is a through hole (sometimes the opening is not there at all)!

    The spare parts catalogs can be downloaded from the Porsche website (PDF): https://www.porsche.com/german…c/originalpartscatalogue/

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    Beste Grüße, Wolfgang

    71 2,2S · 911.02 · 915.02

    73 2,4TE · 911.51 · 915.02

    83 3,0SC · 930.16 · 915.63

  • So the air boxes currently available from Porsche have the nozzle and it is also open. So it has to be closed somehow

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    1982 SC 3,0 US, 930.16 Motor, indisch Rot

    Schiebedach, Klima, Leder schwarz, Bilstein Fahrwerk, Dansk Sportauspuff

    1969 914 Adriablau,umgbaut auf 6zylinder und 5 lochfahrwerk

  • This is what the Vopel looks like

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