Buying advice - 145,000 km...please share your experiences!

  • Good evening dear Porsche drivers, :hilferuf:


    I have come across an offer in the neighborhood of a 924 Targa:

    https://www.kleinanzeigen.de/s…s-neu/2676167542-216-8006


    The mileage is around 145,000 km; the interior looks rather poor.


    Price 5400€ VB.


    Year '77 and 125PS


    What is your experience? Hands off or would it be worth a viewing? What would be a fair price?


    About me: I'm 22 and have some mechanic skills - but have no experience with Porsche so far.


    I look forward to your opinions!

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  • Hello and welcome.

    I also drive a red 77, how fitting. :still:

    The early models don't have galvanized bodywork yet, so rust is an issue to watch out for. Since the paint is apparently still the first and relatively finished, rust spots may have already formed here. Look in particular in the sills through the black grilles in the door and B-pillar!

    In general, paint is a major issue here, it is already peeling off completely in the spare wheel well. But the interior is never as well painted as the exterior anyway. It's almost impossible to pay for a complete paint job these days, it's out of all proportion to the purchase price. H-approval is recommended, for tax reasons alone, so it will at least have to be repainted.


    As you have recognized, the interior is an even bigger construction site. The seats are finished, so you have to reckon with around €1000 for a good set of seats. Don't be surprised, on the early models the rear seat bench was always black and didn't match the front seats. The seller is clever, he never shows the dashboard... But you can see at least one very large crack in the pictures from the outside. It can be annoying, but it doesn't have to be. A new one also costs around €1000-1500. Maybe a used one with few cracks will do or just live with it (like me, but there are only small cracks :roargh:).

    The two strange blinker buttons in the center console are not original and the radio including the strange additional device hanging under the glove compartment is certainly not original. So be prepared for a wild tangle of cables in that area.

    The paneling on the C-pillar has definitely gotten really wet. I would take a close look at what it looks like underneath and behind it. Where there was or is so much moisture, more damage can easily occur.

    Don't even get me started on the disgusting rape of the door panels...


    Unfortunately, you can't see much in the engine compartment, but I don't notice anything seriously bad or "wrong". But that doesn't necessarily mean anything. Is the flow divider green or oxidized? Check that in any case. At the bottom left of the picture you can see a kind of bracket. There shouldn't actually be anything in this area. Check! The inside of the cylinder head looks a bit dark. Overall, it all looks very untouched, but not unkempt. The ignition cables have been replaced, as has the hose from the auxiliary air slide to the intake manifold.

    In general, everything in the engine compartment is simple technology that can be overhauled and maintained easily and relatively cheaply. The K-Jetronic has its pitfalls, but once you have understood it, everything is feasible. However, important K-Jet components are expensive (flow divider, warm-up regulator... between €200 and €400 overhauled).


    Much of the exterior seems to be original. Rear window with chrome without spoiler is cool and the chrome door handles are also very desirable. Only one mirror and no side indicators in the fender is also early and original, unfortunately I can no longer come up with it, it was retrofitted at some point. §-) The rims are not original, but the original ones are included.


    All in all, a car that has been driven and lived in, but not necessarily looked after very well. Most of your work will be on the interior while you gradually overhaul the technology, because something will give up from time to time when you start driving it a lot.

    For the H-approval, you will definitely have to do the interior, depending on the inspector. Keyword "worth preserving".


    Oh yes, the 4-speed gearbox was less popular back then, so the 5-speed option was also available relatively quickly. I use the 4-speed gearbox and it's really fun to drive (especially with the roof down). But you won't win races with it, even if it says Porsche. ;)


    Conclusion:

    Everything is feasible, but a lot of work and unfortunately expensive in places (seats). Simple technology and a nice project for working towards the H license plate, but no "get in and drive off" if you want it to be more than just "drives somehow".

    If you find rust in the sills or in the area where the paneling has been soaked, don't bother! :!:

    If you do everything yourself and only pay for the parts, you will end up with the same price as a good early 924.

    So you'll have to decide for yourself whether you'd rather save another €2000 (+ - ) or whether you fancy a project with work.


    I hope I've been able to help you and that the experts here won't tear me apart tomorrow. :thumbsup:

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    Besten Gruß

    Simon


    Porsche 924 2.0 (1977)

  • The two strange blinker buttons in the center console are not original

    They are probably switches for electric windows from the aftermarket.

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    964 Carrera 2 Cabrio, Tiptronic, Schwarzmetallic, Modelljahr 1991
    924S (946), Indischrot, Modelljahr 1988
    924 Turbo (931), Lhasametallic, Modelljahr 1982

  • Rims are not original,

    Probably Seral 6x14



    6x14.


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    964 Carrera 2 Cabrio, Tiptronic, Schwarzmetallic, Modelljahr 1991
    924S (946), Indischrot, Modelljahr 1988
    924 Turbo (931), Lhasametallic, Modelljahr 1982

  • Hi,


    that's also "in the neighborhood" for me...


    The 924 has its charms (even for me, who already has a 78...), as it's an early model.


    BUT:

    In general, Simon has already written the essentials about the car.

    It certainly still has a lot of work to do.

    Because without H-registration, the vehicle tax (€504/year) is pretty high for the 2l-924... May or may not be relevant.

    The interior needs a lot of attention. And it still has the early interior with the light (slate gray) dashboard.

    If this is to be new again, including the two-tone door panels, it will be time-consuming.

    The old models are not always easy to maintain with the K-Jetronik, at least until everything is working properly (again).

    Z. Warm start, for example...

    Certainly a car with a certain basis, for someone who likes to screw...


    Just have a look, then at least you will have gained some experience.


    Greetings
    Andi

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  • Just have a look, then at least you will have gained some experience.

    Exactly, looking costs nothing. Except nerves, depending on the seller. But in any case, it's important to gather impressions and have comparative material for other viewings.

    I've also seen better 924 2.0s for the money.


    I just had a look and saw that there's another early 924 very close to you:

    https://www.kleinanzeigen.de/s…e-alt/2667736014-216-8646

    It's a lot more expensive, but by the time the other one looks like this one, you'll have spent the same money! Nevertheless, there are still a few things to do here, but the seller(s) seem to know the car well and there is already a small list of defects.

    With the long standing time (since 2012) you have to be a bit careful with the K-Jet and other normal and non-924 specific things (condition tank, etc), but at first rough glance this would be the better option over your ad.


    The car has a PFF sticker, you might even find old posts about the car here on the forum. :)

    EDIT: Found it! ^^ https://www.pff.de/gallery/user-image-list/7617-schnuppieee/

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    Besten Gruß

    Simon


    Porsche 924 2.0 (1977)

  • A new one also costs around €1000-1500. Maybe a used one with a few cracks will do or just live with it (like me, but there are only small cracks :roargh: ).

    Since an H license plate is also recommended. In Munich, the H registration on my dashboard with cracks initially failed. With a new one (€€€ +€€€€ installation) no more problem.


    I would therefore be very careful with the statement "H license plate possible after last MOT". I would clarify this before buying.

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  • Oh well, then definitely check with the examiner first. To put it mildly, I think this is too small-minded and would therefore probably invest the time in finding a relaxed inspector before investing the money in such a new board. For me, it's out of all proportion, you can do soooo much more with that money on the subject of "worth preserving".


    But of course it depends on the degree of cracking. If it's a 1:100 replica of the Grand Canyon, it's going to be difficult everywhere. :D

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    Besten Gruß

    Simon


    Porsche 924 2.0 (1977)

  • So, thank you very much in advance for all the information. The vehicle was inspected - and I decided against it... The dashboard resembled the Grand Canyon, the seats were (felt) worse than in the pictures, a wild tangle of cables on the passenger side and a totally soaked C-pillar from the leak in the trunk. Paint condition was a disaster.


    The salesman lowered the price a bit, but that was too much for the work to be done.

    Thank you anyway for your assessment.

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  • You did everything right, it would have been more of a construction site than a vehicle.

    On the one hand, it's a shame for you, of course, but on the other, I'm pleased that we made the right judgment from a distance. :thumbsup:

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    Besten Gruß

    Simon


    Porsche 924 2.0 (1977)