Range in winter with the Taycan?

  • That's right, the freedom to charge at home is really nice.


    Nevertheless, the comparatively low range is and remains an issue for me and especially the fact that the range goes downhill so drastically in winter + the highway has a heavy impact on consumption

    Winter consumption on long journeys is hardly any different. Especially not if the car is charged to 100% at home or in the hotel and pre-air-conditioned, which is the rule. This is often confused with ski vacations with a roof box or short trips. Consumption is high on short trips in winter. This is due to the fact that it requires a certain amount of power to initially heat up the interior with electricity and this is set against a few kilometers driven. The same applies in midsummer if you make a lot of stops and pre-condition the car while stationary in the sense of pre-cooling. But you may not care what the display says. Because you charge at home in the evening and it's absolutely affordable.


    I live in Potsdam, so basically Berlin, and the range is such that Munich-Berlin requires one stop and two if it's free and you drive faster. Berlin-Ruhr area is similar with a greater tendency towards one stop. Berlin-Hamburg and Berlin-Coast do not require a stop. That's my reality and I used to make the stops the same way with the combustion engine. With passengers, people need more time than the car.

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  • It's all feasible, but as I said, it will only be really nice for me if the e-vehicles manage another 100-200km more in bad conditions.


    Maybe it's just a head thing, but if a 100-150k e car can end up at 250-300km on the highway in winter, then something is still going on in my head.


    Nevertheless, it's a cool car and I'm going to test drive the Taycan soon.

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  • I'm happy about everyone who doesn't buy an electric car. They just block the charging stations.


    I've just driven more than 300 km twice without a break - but in "range" at max. 140 km/h. Start outward journey 100% SoC and return 97. Start outward journey 100% SoC and return journey 97. Outside temperature a few degrees at night on the return journey.


    In between, I also set it to "normal" up to approx. 220 km/h and then let it roll.


    None of this was an issue, although I also drove in such a way that I didn't have to charge. If it hadn't been enough on the way back, I would have recharged for 7 minutes or so in Augsburg.


    Yes, you pay attention to the range. Just like with a combustion engine, by the way. When the tank is empty, I fill up. I then charge the Taycan or my other electric cars. With the Taycan, it's extremely precise; the challenge for me is to arrive at my destination or the charging station with as little SoC as possible.


    Depending on the (non-boring) driving style, the real range in winter is therefore easily 300 km. For the rest, see paragraph 1.


    MUV17:drive:

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    Mitglied des T UV · Ein Auto ist ein Gebrauchsgegenstand. Ich benutze es, um von A nach A zu fahren.

  • Ultimately, however, it remains a really annoying restriction and degrades the e-car to a second car for me. Only when 300 km become more than 500 km on the winter highway would I get rid of the diesel.

    ...because of 10-15 minutes of intermediate charging...? k:facepalm:


    Do you drive this (>500km per day) several times a week? k:scratch:

    You can't even cover 200 km with 10 minutes of intermediate charging. At most on the country road.


    ...

    I live in Potsdam, so basically Berlin, and the range is such that Munich-Berlin requires one stop and two if it's free and you drive faster. Berlin-Ruhr area is similar with a greater tendency towards one stop. Berlin-Hamburg and Berlin-Coast do not require a stop. That's my reality and I used to do the stops the same way with the combustion engine. With passengers, people need more time than the car.

    Just one stop for almost 600 km in the current Taycan? Why do you do that? Then everything has to fit 100% (presumably car pre-air-conditioned, 100% SoC, range mode, suitable HPC perfect on 3/5 route, just over 0% SoC arrival with charging option) and the driving pleasure stays away. What's more, you don't save any time if you have to charge for over 20 minutes after 350 km. It's better to stop twice for 13-15 minutes and arrive more relaxed and earlier at the end.


    Who drives for three hours straight here? Are you still in combustion mode or do you want/need to prove to others that the electric car is so great and that you can get extremely far on one charge?


    There are always two figures for the real range. Start at home with 100% and continue on the road with 75-85%. Then, depending on how you feel, arrive at the SC with 0-10% SoC. Net on the road after the first charge, only 70% of the 300-320 km mentioned.

    This means that an extra 100-150 km range for an electric car would be very welcome. Then you would have a real, speedy 300 km available again after intermediate charging.

    The stress on the battery would also be reduced.

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  • There are always two figures for the real range. Leave home with 100% and continue on the road with 75-85%. Then, depending on your own feeling, arrive at the SC with 0-10% SoC. Net on the road after the first charge, only 70% of the 300-320 km mentioned.

    So an extra 100-150 km range for an electric car would be very welcome

    I can only subscribe to that :thumb:

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    Der eine Gedanke der aus einem Werk ein Opus macht

  • Nevertheless, it's a cool car and I'm going to test drive the Taycan soon.

    That sums it up very well, cool car and you have to experience it for yourself to understand it. Choose the right engine and take your time. Preferably over the weekend, if the dealer is so accommodating. Then you can play through all the scenarios yourself and without time pressure. Short test drives of over an hour are fatal, in which you squeeze out what you can in terms of performance and are ultimately surprised or even annoyed by the high consumption of this short distance.


    Then report back :wink:

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    Viele Grüße aus dem Nordwesten,
    Torsten
    -----------------------------------------


    “The world is a book, and those who do not travel read only one page”
    (Saint Augustine)

  • I agree, more capacity always helps. In ten years' time, cars like the Taycan will have 150 kWh net and then the question of the charging pause will no longer arise. Then there will only be the question of the pause, as with the combustion engine. Especially as you can then use every break on the highway for fast charging. This is because the already dense charging network along the highways will be almost seamless. In addition, ten years will have passed, so that many current doubters will then be driving electrically, making many discussions superfluous.


    But we are now at 83 kWh (soon to be 97 kWh) and the question of range with today's capacity. Theoretically, you only need one stop without having to drive too slowly. The problem with all long-distance journeys on busy routes is currently the roadworks situation. You automatically get further than you actually wanted to. How many breaks of what length you actually take is a completely different question. It should be clear today that you need to be preconditioned for long journeys and start with 100% SoC. When I'm traveling alone, it has happened that I've driven all the way to Himmelkron in three hours. This can result in an SoC of 1-2%. Of course, you have to be able and willing to do that. If that suits you, you have a nice "range extension" with the current capacity.

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  • A question for everyone: Do you all drive slower than you did back then with a combustion engine, or long distances in general?


    I drive 250 km at a stretch at least once a month and my normal speed I aim for is just under 190 km/h. If I want to go faster, I also drive longer stretches over 200 km/h. Do you avoid this completely? I usually consume a little over 11 liters with this driving style, don't stop and fill up just before returning.


    And if I'm going on vacation, I don't yet know how to do it. Skiing over Christmas means leaving at 4 a.m. to avoid the block clearance in time. Then to wait another 20 minutes ... And what about at airports. If I drive the 200 km to Fraport, land again at night and want to go home, the car should then need electricity again. Or are you allowed to stop at the chargers (if available)?


    So to each his own, it's not a criticism of the vehicles, but rather the question of how you handle it. I don't really see it in my profile yet 😅

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  • No, I always drive long distances between 160 and 180 whenever possible, but sometimes over 200.


    If in doubt, you have to plan one more charging stop.

    But often the weather, traffic or roadworks don't allow me to do that. But I don't drive in the Regal at night either

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    Der eine Gedanke der aus einem Werk ein Opus macht

  • My feel-good speed was and still is 180 km/h, occasionally 210. Nothing has changed since I got the Taycan.


    I don't do the A7 and block clearance anymore and drive via Mittenwald, so the time doesn't really matter. Next week I'll be heading for the Dolomites again, a good 1,000 kilometers, and I won't be leaving here in the northwest before 6 am. So I should be there around 7 pm.


    I've never driven to the airport in the Taycan, so maybe someone else can answer that.

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    Viele Grüße aus dem Nordwesten,
    Torsten
    -----------------------------------------


    “The world is a book, and those who do not travel read only one page”
    (Saint Augustine)