Retail value of a reconditioned 3.6 / 3.8 l Carrera

  • It was a normal 325PS engine, which then supposedly had 370PS.

    OT: So you basically turned the 3.4 into a 4.0?

    Can you tell us about your experiences? Character of the engine? Was it worth it?

    No, it was the 3.6 "problem engine :/ :saint:". With the different displacement, it was a bit rougher to rev, but there was a nice increase in torque. My 3.8 FL, which I had at the same time, was weaker at the bottom end, but more powerful at higher revs: to be expected. The revised engine didn't like the 10W60, I think it was one or two hydraulic tappets that were noisy and only became quiet at higher oil temperatures. After changing to 0W40 it was quiet. Hardly any oil consumption and approx. 1 - 1/2 liters less fuel consumption.

    Otherwise unremarkable and I would dare to do it again.

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  • Hello everyone,

    thanks for the feedback! I knew that there wasn't a lot of experience of selling revised 997.1s, as hardly anyone wants to give them away ;)

    But I'm surprised that the market doesn't reward the overhaul at all. It's not just a matter of repairing imminent/acute engine damage, but of ironing out a central, cost-intensive weak point with a high investment! I would have expected that perhaps 50% of the investment, and then devalued proportionally to the mileage after the overhaul, would go into a higher sales price.
    Roughly speaking, from the perspective of the price difference between the 997.2 and 997.1 (without PDK, manual transmission only): The 997.2 is a whopping10k more than the previous 997.1 because it has the more durable DI-Alsusil closed-deck engine. I would have expected to recoup some of this difference with the overhaul.

    But on the other hand, it doesn't seem to be the case that a revision is a flaw for the "PZ checkbook-maintained, 1st hand summer car Porsche average buyer", which is punished with price reductions ("because it's no longer original").

    Nevertheless, as a 997.1 driver, I still have a disappointing feeling in my stomach...

    Have a nice evening,

    Mark

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    997 VFL 3,6 l Coupé als Handschalter.

    911er sind einige der wenigen Kunstwerke, die schneller als 250 km/h fahren !

  • Where exactly is the surcharge supposed to come from? The buyer expects a functioning engine, overhauled or not. Obvious defects or pending major issues lead to discounts, an overhaul restores the expected condition, so in my view the price is identical for comparable vehicles.

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  • From my point of view: A functioning engine is expected, and only enthusiasts will pay for additional performance through "optimization" (i.e. wait until someone comes along); a defect, however, leads to a reduction in value. I would exclude the "everything-orischinaal-mätsching-nambers" faction from the Gaussian normal distribution of buyers, as they are regularly at the extreme end and, incidentally, blessed with burning hats...

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    Im Alltag: 2019 Tesla Model 3 Performance
    Zum Spass: 2007 Porsche Boxster S 3.4

  • To be able to sell a reconditioned car WELL, you need patience and have to be able to put up with the clever comments of the "interested parties", as well as the "last price" faction. I don't have the understanding for that. Conversely, I get restless when I find something like this on the Internet or elsewhere. There are too few real experts on the subject, but many with half-knowledge and a genuine desire to buy.

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  • To be able to sell a reconditioned car WELL, you need patience and have to be able to put up with the clever comments of the "interested parties", as well as the "last price" faction. I don't have the understanding for that. Conversely, I get restless when I find something like this on the Internet or elsewhere. There are too few real experts on the subject, but many with half-knowledge and a real desire to buy.

    Sorry: of course, ....and a genuine desire to buy!

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  • Hello everyone!

    I would be prepared to pay around 5,000 more here. I currently have a yellow 997 VFL on my radar - but it costs around 15,000 more than a comparable car without an overhaul.

    comparable car without an overhaul - so of course I'd rather buy one without an overhaul and hope that it lasts - the 2000 KM I drive a year, if not, I can still invest the 15 k ... and then have a new revision - from the company that I think is the best ...

    LG OliB

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  • Hello OliB,

    Your idea of value is in line with what I have in mind! Of course, it is not possible to allocate the revision costs 1:1. It's better to buy another vehicle in the hope of being spared premature track wear!

    Furthermore, part of the overhaul costs is also a repair that leads to the expected normal condition of a "functioning engine".

    Ultimately, however, based on the feedback from the forum here, I have little hope that a possible professional overhaul will significantly increase the value of my 997 C2:

    - First of all, you have to find a buyer who can technically evaluate and assess this. I think that is rather rare...

    - You can only assume a part of the costs as an increase in value, which also decreases with increasing mileage since the revision

    Best regards :wink:,

    Markus

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    997 VFL 3,6 l Coupé als Handschalter.

    911er sind einige der wenigen Kunstwerke, die schneller als 250 km/h fahren !

  • Hello,

    I see it as follows: I've done my research and have been conditioned in certain forums to believe that my dream car will necessarily need a revision at some point. Then I see two cars of equal value, one is reconditioned (as I would have it done), the other car is not. Would I be prepared to pay a little more for the overhauled car? Yes, definitely!

    I keep reading here that some people buy a 987 and "put aside" the 15k for the revision, you can of course do that and invest the money. From a rational point of view, however, it would probably be better to spend 7k more on a revised model. This is an argument for the fact that you can and should achieve a better price. Of course, it is not an argument for a preventive overhaul ;)

    Of course, this only applies to people who know what it's all about. Before I bought a Porsche, some people told me that they needed a service every 10tkm. If you meet a buyer who has no idea, then it probably doesn't matter. They'll believe that a checkbook is enough because the inspection is included ;)

    Greetings

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  • Hi all

    As I have been very intensively involved with this, I can only say that I would always take a reconditioned engine instead of a normal one when it comes to the M96 or M97.

    As a buyer of a used engine with approx. 140tkm you don't know how the predecessor handled it and that makes a lot of difference with this engine from my point of view, then you are better off getting a reconditioned one. Of course, it also depends on who did this.

    Greetings

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