Replacing the injectors on the 987.2 FL X51 engine ?

  • Hello all,

    drive a 987.2 FL Cayman S PDK year 2011 with a comfortable 52'000 km on it. The engine is yes constructively better than the predecessor and runs wonderfully.

    A long-suffering Porsche driver friend has now recommended that I replace the injectors at the latest at 60,000 km as a precautionary measure. If the so-called X51 DFI engines had a problem, it would be the nozzles. If one of them is defective, there is a risk of a major engine failure.


    The same engine was also used in the Boxter 987.2, the 997.2 and the 981.


    I wanted to ask in the forum, who has made experiences in this regard and at what mileage.


    Thanks and greetings all around

    Oliver

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  • The 3.4 DFI from the 987 was never built as X51. X51 is the designation for Porsche performance upgrades.


    Otherwise, there are reports of defective injectors in DFI engines that lead to engine damage.

    Good fuel is probably an important story with the valves. I would fill up Aral 102 Octane every now and then (complete tank) to clean the nozzles.

    Especially if the car is mothballed over the winter it is advisable to run a load of it through the engine before hibernation to prevent the jets from sticking.

    Since they are certainly not very cheap I would not just replace them. A good workshop should be able to check the spray pattern of the nozzles.

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    Boxster S 2008
    Carrera GT3 2006

  • Regarding the code X51 we are both right, because in the Porsche engine world it is used twice:

    (a) On the one hand as a code for the direct injection engines as quoted in my question, see also:
    https://iloveporsche.de/porsch…auer-von-porsche-motoren/

    b) and then for the factory performance-enhanced versions of various 911 engines, e.g. already on the 993 from 285 to 300 hp:
    https://motorlegenden.de/autos…x51-wls-3-8-liter-300-ps/


    Is therefore sometimes confusing. I am concerned with the DFI engines of type X51.

    Oliver

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  • Sorry, but this is not an official Porsche site. X51 is only used by Porsche for WLS engines.


    I don't know where people get the idea to call a DFI an X51 in general. The DFI engines are called A120 and A121 in contrast to the manifold injectors M9720, M9721 and M9722.

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  • My question here is a specific question about the injectors.

    The term X51 has now become common for the first DFI generation, you can find x times on the net, including from people who know their business:
    https://wendland-motorentechni…-s-x51-3-8l-280-kw-381-ps


    A120 and A121 are part of the engine code, therefore also correct, but very rarely used. In the 997.2 the engines are called MA101 or 102.

    X51 is the generic term for all these engines with DFI, which are identical in technical principle.


    I don't care where this comes from, and I'm here for help on my question.

    Thanks for answers to this.

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  • At the risk of being considered pushy and know-it-all.


    NO


    the DFI is not generally an X51.


    Wendland also explicitly talks about 3.8L engine with performance upgrade on his site (the 381hp engine is also the X51 intake manifold injector).


    On the 987 Boxster and Cayman there is no X51 and the DFI is not called X51.


    Just look in the PET of the 997 and the 987, then you understand. X51 is only available for the Carrera S and the Turbo.


    Porsche Classic Genuine Parts Catalog and Price List - Porsche Germany

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  • It is perfectly clear to me that in the official Porsche world X51 stands for the WLS boost versions.


    I am concerned with the naturally aspirated DFI engines across all series and the injectors for them. Thanks for contributions on this.

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  • Precautionary replacement of supposedly bad components is often regarded as "professional competence". With many parts, such as the fuel injectors, this is a case of excrement for cloven hoofed animals!

    If the injectors are missing, you will notice it immediately by the running behavior of the engine and you will get an error message very quickly, because the corresponding cylinder will then show faulty ignitions.


    Greetz

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    Nach 320'000 Spiegeleiern kann die Kantine nicht so schlecht gewesen sein!
    Harm Lagaay


    PS: Ich heisse nicht Greetz k:thinking:

  • Precautionary replacement of supposedly bad components is often regarded as "professional competence". With many parts, such as the fuel injectors, this is a case of excrement for cloven hoofed animals!

    If the injectors are missing, you will notice it immediately by the running behavior of the engine and you will get an error message very quickly, because the corresponding cylinder will then show faulty ignitions.


    Greetz

    I would not hope/trust in the error message. And not everybody can judge the running culture of a B6 correctly. Otherwise there would not be the damage pattern.


    But as already written above, I would not simply exchange functioning nozzles. Especially not at 60K km mileage.

    You can also just have them checked.


    Injector | BoschCarService Fetzer | Check and clean injectors | Gießen (boschservice-fetzer.de)

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    Boxster S 2008
    Carrera GT3 2006

  • It's purely a precautionary measure, that's clear. But since the Cayman isn't moved much, static damage/deposits can also happen.

    It always gets 98 or 100 octane.

    I've been told that these things can also break down suddenly, burn out and then permanently inject too much fuel with the corresponding consequences for the cylinders. Should probably also happen in VW vehicles with DFI or even in Cayennes with DFI. So who has already experienced something like this with the DFI boxer-aspirators, no matter what mileage, so I would be interested.

    Let's see how the PZ sees the next pit stop, whether they also check them or immediately smell the exchange business.

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