Buying advice used Cayenne

  • if you want to have a car at short notice, order at the moment is not so the right option,

    especially since then it is not sure whether it comes with the equipment as desired and ordered.

    That is why the prices for used cars are relatively high.

    This post has been automatically translated.

  • My Cayenne Coupe E-Hybrid BJ 20 automatically has an (electric) parking heater. It can be activated via app or timer in the car.

    This post has been automatically translated.

    letzter Sauger, letzter Lufti, einfach porschiastisch!

  • My Cayenne Coupe E-Hybrid BJ 20 automatically has an (electric) parking heater. It can be activated via app or timer in the car.

    All Cayenne E-Hybrid models have this. The auxiliary heater does not have to be installed separately as a unit, as in the conventional combustion engine, but runs on the large battery.

    It is also an old wives' tale that a hybrid must be more vulnerable than a conventional combustion engine. I have been driving the current Cayenne model for 3.5 years now. First a Turbo and for a year now a Turbo S E-Hybrid. Both vehicles don't (didn't) cause any problems. The hybrid is even advantageous for me because I don't need the combustion engine on short trips. The combustion engine thanks me for this with normal oil consumption (the Turbo needed 1 l of oil per 5000 km) and a sensational consumption of 9.9 l/100 km (the Turbo consumed 5 l more).

    This post has been automatically translated.

  • 3.5 years is certainly not a period for meaningful experience in terms of susceptibility.

    Cayennes are usually driven for 20 years and more, not by 1st lease new car owners, of course.

    Here we are talking about used cars and technology means problems at some point and more technology means more problems.

    These are experiences and no old wives' tales, in appropriate Facebook groups you can read that.

    And that at least batteries do not last forever is certainly undisputed.

    This post has been automatically translated.

  • Thanks for the input from all of you. I'll take a look at the cow. Any current e-hybrid drivers have experience if the battery is part of the Approved warranty?

    Thanks and best regards

    Tom

    This post has been automatically translated.

  • Stupid question from a new Cayenne owner: Don't you also have a 4-year warranty on everything? Or is that a Swiss thing?

    This post has been automatically translated.

    Edited once, last by huldi (January 10, 2023 at 2:09 PM).

  • Thanks for the input from all of you. I'll take a look at the cow. Any current e-hybrid drivers have experience if the battery is part of the Approved warranty?

    Thanks and best regards

    Tom

    The battery yes, the vehicle battery is not.

    This post has been automatically translated.

  • Stupid question from a new Cayenne owner: Don't you also have a 4-year warranty on everything? Or is that a Swiss thing?

    In Germany, there's only a two-year warranty.

    This post has been automatically translated.

  • 3.5 years is certainly not a period for meaningful experience in terms of susceptibility.

    Cayennes are usually driven for 20 years and more, not by 1st lease new car owners, of course.

    Here we are talking about used cars and technology means problems at some point and more technology means more problems.

    These are experiences and no old wives' tales, in appropriate Facebook groups you can read that.

    And that at least batteries do not last forever is certainly undisputed.

    But to claim that PHEV's generally cause more problems than internal combustion vehicles, without having long-term experience, is also not meaningful. Because as you write, Cayenne models are usually driven longer than the 5 years that the Cayenne PHEV has now been on the market.

    So there is still no long-term experience in terms of susceptibility to faults, etc. Hardly any manufacturer currently has this with PHEV or hybrid models.

    The only one that does is Toyota with the Prius. The model has been in production for 25 years and the cars seem to be very reliable. At least they are often used in cab operations, where they get 300,000 km or more on the hump. And if they were that unreliable, no cab company would use a Prius anymore.

    This post has been automatically translated.

  • But to claim across the board that PHEVs generally cause more problems than internal combustion vehicles, without having any long-term experience, is also not meaningful. Because as you write, Cayenne models are usually driven for longer than the 5 years that the Cayenne PHEV has now been on the market.

    So there is still no long-term experience in terms of susceptibility to faults, etc. Hardly any manufacturer currently has such experience with PHEV or hybrid models.

    You should know that the predecessor model 958 was already available as a hybrid, so there is also initial long-term experience, which I also referred to.

    And if in the current model after 3 years, so outside the warranty, the start battery must be replaced for 1800 euros, which is also not an exception, as I often read.

    Exception is, as I often read, then that is also no Schnapper and the hybrid advantages are thus completely down the drain. And that more equipment usually leads to more problems, we also know from many years of experience with all and older cars.

    I therefore claim nothing sweeping, I read, see, hear and experience and not only here.

    And as the crowning glory of it all try to sell a hybrid or full-E shortly before the end of the warranty on the battery again.....

    Sorry, the cab comparison is nonsensical. It makes a difference whether I drive the 300k km in 3 years or in 15.

    Batteries are also subject to aging in terms of time, not only in terms of use, you actually already know from cell phones and laptops.

    Diesel engines held in the cab due to continuous operation km-mässig also longer than with the grandpa with many cold starts.

    This post has been automatically translated.